Wednesday, May 04, 2016

How to get to Dr Josh Rotenberg & Dr Michelle Nwosu - Sugar Land Pediatric Neurology Epilepsy Sleep Neurophysiology

DIRECTIONS TO OUR SUGAR LAND OFFICE 
Methodist Hospital MOB 1
16651 Southwest Freeway, Suite 320
Sugar Land, Texas  77479


Our office is located in the Medical Office Building #1 at the Methodist Sugar Land Hospital.  The facility provides outside parking at no charge.  There is not a valet parking service.

From the Northeast:
Follow 59 South to Sugar Land, exit at Sweetwater Blvd; follow the feeder road and make a “U Turn” under the freeway; make an immediate right at the Methodist Sugar Land Hospital sign; follow the road about 200 yards; make a left into the hospital parking lot; make a left at the 3-way stop sign; follow the parking lot around to the Medical Office Building #1 entrance (MOB #1 is four-stories tall and faces the freeway). We are located on the third floor, Ste 320.

From Katy:
Take the Grand Parkway (Hwy 99) until it ends at Hwy 59; take 59 North two exits to Sweetwater Blvd; exit Sweetwater Blvd and stay on the feeder passing the stop light for Sweetwater Blvd, make an immediate right at the Methodist Sugar Land Hospital sign; follow the road about 200 yards; make a left into the hospital parking lot; make a left at the 3-way stop sign; follow the parking lot around to the Medical Office Building #1 entrance (MOB #1 is four-stories tall and faces the freeway). We are located on the third floor, Ste 320.

From the Memorial Area:
Go South on Beltway 8, exit onto 59 South; follow 59 South to Sugar Land, exit at Sweetwater Blvd; follow the feeder road and make a “U Turn” under the freeway; make an immediate right at the Methodist Sugar Land Hospital sign; follow the road about 200 yards; make a left into the hospital parking lot; make a left at the 3-way stop sign; follow the parking lot around to the Medical Office Building #1 entrance (MOB #1 is four-stories tall and faces the freeway). We are located on the third floor, Ste 320.

From Angleton:

Take Hwy 6 North to Hwy 59 South; turn left onto the feeder road of Hwy 59 South; stay on the feeder to the next stoplight at Sweetwater Blvd; make a “U-Turn” under the freeway; make an immediate right at the Methodist Sugar Land Hospital sign; follow the road about 200 yards; make a left into the hospital parking lot; make a left at the 3-way stop sign; follow the parking lot around to the Medical Office Building #1 entrance (MOB #1 is four-stories tall and faces the freeway). We are located on the third floor, Ste 320.

Sunday, May 01, 2016

What is ataxia? Good Review Article


What is Ataxia?

Balance and coordination are products of complex circuitry involving the basal ganglia, cerebellum and cerebral cortex, as well as peripheral motor and sensory pathways. Malfunction of any part of this intricate circuitry can lead to imbalance and incoordination, or ataxia, of gait, the limbs or eyes, or a combination thereof. 

Ataxia can be a symptom of a multisystemic disorder, or it can manifest as the major component of a disease process. 

Ongoing discoveries of genetic abnormalities suggest the role ofmitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, abnormal mechanisms of DNA repair, possible protein misfolding, and abnormalities in cytoskeletal proteins. Few ataxias are fully treatable, and most are symptomatically managed. 

A discussion of the ataxias is presented here with brief mention of acquired ataxias, and a greater focus on inherited ataxias.

FREE article here

Watch for Clinical Trials in Stem Cells in US Soon in Spinocerebellar Ataxia

Steminent Biotherapeutics Inc. receives 

US FDA Orphan Drug Designation for Stemchymal® in the 

Treatment of Polyglutamine 

Spinocerebellar Ataxia (PolyQ SCAs)

SourcePress Release
CompanySteminent Biotherapeutics 
TagsOrphan Drug Status
DateJanuary 01, 2016
In December 2015, Steminent received US FDA Orphan Drug Designation for Stemchymal ® in the treatment of PolyQ SCAs. The US FDA’s Orphan Drug Designation program provides orphan status to drugs and biologics intended for both safe and effective treatment of rare indications that affect fewer than 200,000 people in the U.S. 
The granted designation also allows Steminent to enjoy a 7-year market exclusivity upon approval of Stemchymal ® and other development incentives including tax credits for clinical research costs and Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) fee exemption.
 Stemchymal ® is the proprietary, allogenic  MSC product developed by Steminent for treatment of selected diseases with unmet or underserved medical needs. 
The company’s  SCA  clinical study is now in the Phase II stage.

Texas Resources for Disabilites




http://www.dads.state.tx.us/


http://www.hhsc.state.tx.us/MBI.shtml


http://www.thearcoftexas.org/site/PageServer?pagename=inclusion_educational_resources

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

iOS 9.3 "Night Shift" will limit sleep disruption from your screen. It makes physiologic sense.

Night Shift: How this iOS 9.3 feature helped me sleep better

It's not a cure-all, but Apple's new setting reduces eye strain

Night Shift iOS 9 3 Apple news
Night Shift is one iOS 9.3 feature that I'm not going to lose sleep over, even if I keep tossing and turning over whether or not to upgrade to that downsized iPad Air 9.7.
This is Apple's brand new display software that tints my screen a more eye-friendly shade of orange by using my iPhone and iPad clock and geolocation to slowly reduce the amount of sleep-inhibiting blue light emitted.
I've basically been bathing in intense blue light every night before this, reading and working on my mobile devices, even though I'm fully aware it messes with my circadian rhythm and makes it harder for me to fall asleep.



Full article HERE

Thursday, March 24, 2016

Make a Difference Every Night & Day. Open Position – Sleep & EEG Technician HOUSTON TX

Open Position – Sleep & EEG Technician HOUSTON TX


Open Position – Sleep & EEG Technician HOUSTON TX

Multi-location Pediatric Focused (Adults Welcome too) Sleep/EEG Center in Houston, Texas is currently seeking FT and PT/PRN EEG/ Respiratory/Polysomnographic Technicians to join our team. 

Responsibilities include: Performing sleep studies on adult and pediatric patients, including PAP titrations and oxygen therapy when applicable. Attach electrodes using the 10-20 system ensuring proper lead placement and low impedances. Monitor patients throughout the sleep study - documenting observations, troubleshooting artifact, and collecting data. Attention to patients needs in a courteous and professional manner, safeguarding private/protected information. Clean lab equipment per lab standards while maintaining a clean and safe work environment.

All applicants must have excellent communication skills, comfort with children, experience in sleep OR EEG. Current enrollment /completion of AASM modules is a plus . RTs with previous sleep or EEG experience welcome.

Licensed EMT’s with strong personal skills/ qualifications in pediatrics are welcome to apply. Other requirements include current CPR, BCLS or ACLS certification; computer literacy; excellent verbal and written communication skills. Must be professional, detail-oriented with a high standard of professionalism and work ethic. 

Please send a letter or CV cheryls@academydxsleep.com 

for more information.

Friday, March 11, 2016

Concussion article in The Economist

Its not just a sports injury. Its a brain injury with effects that can last for years. 

If your child has a had a concussion or otehr brain injury and still has problems, call your doctor or a specialist. JR


Concussion

Bang to rights

FRED McNEILL, an American-football player, died in November at the age of 63. Between 1974 and 1985 he appeared for the Minnesota Vikings. After leaving them he became a lawyer but in later years suffered from dementia and was told that he had signs of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a degenerative brain disease. His recent death has become a milestone in the understanding of brain disorders, for post-mortem examination has confirmed this diagnosis—retrospectively making him the first person to be so diagnosed while alive.

CTE is the physical manifestation in the brain of punch-drunk syndrome—or dementia pugilistica, to give its Latinised, medical name. As that name suggests, this form of dementia particularly affects boxers, who are hit on the head as a matter of course. But doctors now understand that it is also a problem in people like Mr McNeill, who get hit on the head accidentally in contact sports. Mr McNeill, along with several other retired players, volunteered to let researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) use a scanning technique called positron-emission tomography (PET) to look at their brains.

In his case, and in those of others who had suffered concussion (a form of brain injury that leads to headaches, dizziness and nausea, and causes blackouts in 10% of those who experience it), this revealed a pattern of abnormal protein deposits. Mr McNeill’s death enabled his scans to be compared with the results of an autopsy. That confirmed the PET-based diagnosis. Specifically, PET was recording deposits in his brain of a protein called tau, which is tied to CTE and other neurological disorders, including Alzheimer’s.

Suffer the little children

In the end, adult athletes can make up their own minds about what risks they wish to take. Children, though, cannot. It is therefore children who should attract the greatest attention. Not only are some children obliged to play contact sports at school, but they may also be participating in an environment that encourages a “stiff upper lip” when they are injured. Yet it has been clear since a study published in 2012 by Andrew Mayer at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque that subtle brain changes in children who have sustained a concussion persist for months after the injury, even when there are no longer any obvious symptoms.

Work published last December by Charles Hillman of the University of Illinois found that children who had sustained a single sports-related concussion still had impaired brain function two years later

Ten-year-olds with a history of concussion performed worse on tests of working memory, attention and impulse control than did uninjured confrères. Among the children with a history of concussion, those who were injured earlier in life had larger deficits. This study was small (it involved 15 injured participants) but if subsequent research confirms it, that will be great cause for concern.